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One-on-One Meetings - They Matter More Than You Know

By Kate Zabriskie

05/01/19

There are only a handful in my department. Why should I bother with a formal meeting? We see each other every day.

I tried meeting individually with my direct reports, but they had nothing to talk about. Besides, we’re all adults. We know what we’re supposed to be doing at work.

Without trying too hard, it’s easy for many managers to compile a long list of reasons not to meet with the people they supervise.

And guess what? The volume of reasons does not outweigh the value and importance of a regularly scheduled tête-à-tête with a direct report.

BENEFITS OF REGULAR ONE-ON-ONE MEETINGS

If used correctly, over time managers and employees can enjoy many benefits by meeting one on one:

Visible Appreciation
Time is currency. If managers carve out time for their people and are prepared when they meet, they show they value their direct reports.

Better Thinking
Regular one-on-one meetings give managers and employees space to step away from the urgent and immediate and to think more holistically and strategically about work, goals, and development opportunities.

Stronger Results
Accountability tends to improve when people have an opportunity or a requirement to report on their progress.

PERFECT ONE-ON-ONE

Once a manager has bought into the value of one-on-one meetings, the next step is to execute them in a way that works for the manager and the employee. Good one-on-one meetings are not one-size-fits-all activities. That said, there are a few guidelines that can make a one-on-one meeting successful.

1. Pick a Schedule and Stick to It
One-on-ones shouldn’t regularly disappear from the calendar simply because something else suddenly comes up.

2. Choose a Frequency that Makes Sense
For some people, meeting once a month may be enough. For others, meeting weekly may be more appropriate. Every relationship is different. Furthermore, circumstances evolve. Depending on what’s happening inside and outside of the organization, an employee’s needs could change drastically. Meeting frequency should be looked at from time to time. If the rate of meetings is correct, managers and employees should not routinely find themselves with no reason to meet.

3. Follow a Written Agenda
Well-run one-on-one meetings are not free-for-all conversations. They follow an agenda just as any other good meeting does. A one-on-one meeting agenda might include such topics as current projects, progress on developing new skills, current challenges, and so forth.

4. Give Employees Some Control
Put employees in the driver’s seat by having them manage and document the agenda. As a manager, you may create the initial agenda format. But once you do, your employees should take ownership of the documents associated with their one-on-one meetings.

TROUBLESHOOTING

One-on-one meetings rarely go from nonexistent or dysfunctional to perfect overnight. For that reason, managers should prepare to overcome a variety of obstacles.

Obstacle 1: Employees Question the New Meeting
Solution:
Reduce the surprise factor. If a manager has never held one-on-one meetings, they might come as a surprise to employees. To avoid feelings of uncertainty, confusion, or worse, socialize the idea before loading the calendar with unexpected surprises. “This year, I would like to focus more on individual development. Within the next week or two, please expect to see a meeting scheduled with me. I believe we will all benefit if I spend time with each of you individually at regularly scheduled intervals. How often we will meet will depend on each of your needs and what we decide together.”

Obstacle 2: An Employee Doesn’t Take Charge of the Meeting
Solution:
Show them how. A good agenda can go a long way toward making the conversation flow. Although employees should have ultimate responsibility for keeping the agenda, this may take time. In the beginning, managers may have to model what they want to see. “For our first few meetings, I’ll prepare the agenda. Once we’ve found our groove, my plan is to turn it over to you to own. This means you’ll add to it between meetings and bring a copy for you and me when we meet.”

Obstacle 3: An Employee Gives Short or General Answers to Questions
Solution:
Get specific. The more focused a manager’s questions are, the better the conversation tends to be. For example, instead of asking, “What are you working on,” a manager might say, “Tell me about the task that is going best right now and why that is.”

Obstacle 4: An Employee Seems Unresponsive
Solution: Leverage silence. When managers don’t get immediate feedback, they sometimes mistake silence for non-responsiveness. It’s important for managers to remember they already know the questions. The employee is hearing them for the first time and may need some time to digest and think about what’s being asked. Instead of rephrasing questions that don’t produce an immediate answer, managers need to get comfortable with letting silence sit in the room.  

REEVALUATE FROM TIME TO TIME

Like anything, one-on-one meetings can get stale. It’s important to look at the format and frequency from time to time and to solicit feedback regarding what’s working and what isn’t.

If you’ve fallen out of the habit of holding regular one-on-one meetings or if you’re not getting all you could from them, now is the time to take another look. After all, can you really afford not to?

 

Kate Zabriskie is the president of Business Training Works Inc., a Maryland-based talent development firm. She and her team help businesses establish customer service strategies and train their people to live up to what’s promised. For more information, visit www.businesstrainingworks.com.



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